News

Decolonial Curatorial Agenda for a Green New Deal
Platform Art Council Korea
Curated by Bas Hendrikx

Performance lecture A Global Climate Event
Haus der Kulturen der Welt Berlin 2021
https://www.hkw.de/en/programm/projekte/veranstaltung/p_184819.php
Upcoming essay in New Alphabet book series 2021

Exhibition cleptocrazia & performance lecture
Number calls to Number, Number calls me Home
Villa Romana Florence 2021

Fellowship Rethinking Environments
Rachel Carson Center Munich
In collaboration with CREAM,
Westminster University London
2021 - 2026

Recent features:
https://www.dewitteraaf.be/artikel/detail/nl/4786 https://www.metropolism.com/nl/features/41005_de_complexiteit_van_de_online_crowd_in_gesprek_met_jasmijn_visser_studio_visit_11 https://www.kunstfort.nl/en/journal/jasmijn-visser-occur-embracing-the-complexity-of-climate-change/

We, the Presidents of Planet Earth
Film and Publication in development, expected summer 2021
In collaboration with Elena Vogman and S†ëfan Schäfer
Together with Archive Books Berlin

Participation CLICON Anglo-German workgroup
Climate controversies in online culture
Leeds & Cologne 2021

Projects

Under the Weather/Mooi Weer Spelen

Videogame

2021 (upcoming)

Under the Weather/Mooi Weer Spelen

Under the Weather/Mooi Weer Spelen, sketch image, Jasmijn Visser.



Dynamic complexity model

Under the Weather/Mooi Weer Spelen is a bilingual video game which navigates through the complexities of climate change.
In the video game, the player wakes up and discovers that the weather has been 'canceled'.
The player must find out who canceled it and how to get it back.
Visser builds this world by using a selection of anecdotes from the sound archive of the Meertens Institute.
Based on the philosophy of Post Normal Science, Visser tries to make connections between hard and soft science in order to enrich the model of climate change.
The project investigates how video games could function as a dynamic complexity model.
The video game will be launched during a conference at the Meertens Institute and be available through Left Gallery.

Serf Club

Algorithm, Website

2016

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Serf Club, press image.



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Serf Club, press image.



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The man efficiently attacked the topography. Serf Club, screen capture.



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The girl would be alright. Serf ClubSerf Club, screen capture.



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I was blocked, Serf Club, excerpt.



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The child needed the prop. Serf Club, excerpt.



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Zac was sad. Serf Club, excerpt.



Randomness and meaning.

Serf Club is an infinite film constructed from global live streams. A drama playing out in real life and in real time. The algorithmic director, influenced by intuitive, geographical, relational factors, modulates an audio-visual signal to make meaning appear and disappear. Shot reverse shot. Close-up on tangled plotlines. Build suspense and tear it down. Cut to cables snaking across borders. Cue music. Algorithmic real time film.

For the project Serf Club, Visser and design collective PWR re-evaluated mapping in the age of internet 2.0. This development coincided with the bombings and attacks of ISIS on Brussels, Munich and Istanbul, in which the livestream was a recurring medium of immediate information. They became interested in the livestream as an immediate map, as well as its aesthetics. This led to the creation of the continuous live film Serf Club, an algorithm gathering and displaying content in real time. Serf Club connects to 2500 livestreams distributed evenly over the world, and simultaneously generates narrative and sound. It is a tool continuously balancing between randomness and meaning.

In collaboration with PWR Studio.
Serf Club evolves with every viewing, the first version was shown at Delfina Foundation December 2016, continued at Transitdisplay in Prague and was streamed at CENART Mexico City as part of the exhibition Infosphere. Serf Club was featured as opening event at Transmediale 2018, Face Value.

Conflict Atlas

Publication, Website

2017

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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, cover.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, folded spread.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, spread.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, spread.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, spread.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, spread.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. On-site research, crash site on Pebble Island.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Conflict Atlas, spread.



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Climate Control event Whitechapel Gallery. Conflict Atlas, book-launch.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Power Play, SongEun Project Space Seoul, exhibition view.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. Power Play, SongEun Project Space Seoul, exhibition view.



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Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago. thefalklandsproject.com, website capture.



Complexity and geopolitical conflict.

For the publication Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago, Visser shifted the centre of the world to the Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas, and looked at global geopolitical conflict from the archipelago’s perspective, with a method of both stratifying vertically, as well as mapping horizontally. Global events are mirrored to local proceedings on the archipelago. Through this method it explores trade routes, colonial enterprises, patterns of migration, questions of identity, strategies in warfare and the role of the climate in social issues.

Within this tension field the atlas detects movements and events that are contingent in character and can reflect on general human behaviour in geopolitical conflicts.

Go to website

In collaboration with design collective Metahaven and Archive Books Berlin.
Commissioned by TAAK and Land Art Contemporary.
Contributions by: Clare Butcher, Tendai Mutunhu, Maurizio Lazzarato, Federico Lorenz, Metahaven, Tristan Mostert.
Launch the Netherlands: Allard Pierson Museum Amsterdam 2017.
Launch Germany: Hamburger Bahnhof Museum 2017.
Launch United Kingdom: Whitechapel Gallery 2017.
Launch South Korea: Song Eun Project Space 2018.

Modern Candor

Solo Exhibition, Archive

2017

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Provisional Geological map of Rhodesia 1977 & Geological Map of Northern Rhodesia 1928, Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Exhibition entrance,with Conflict Atlas. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Lunar Chart (Grimaldi Lac 74), 1971, 144 parts & geological map of Nepal in 5 parts. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Lunar Chart (Grimaldi Lac 74), 1971, 144 parts & Conflict Atlas spreads. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Lunar Chart (Grimaldi Lac 74), 1971, 144 parts, detail. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Zimbabwe Rhodesia Climatic Comfort- Discomfort Belts and Building Design 1979, Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Plan Projet Ferme Coloniale et strategique de Canalisation Agricole Industrielle Commerciale et maritime. Modern Candor, press image.



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Carte Geographique pour servir a l’étude du canal interocéanique par l’Isthme du Darien, 1859, quadriptich. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Atlas for Zimbabwe editorial aviser: H.A.B. Simons, 1981. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Atlas for Zimbabwe editorial aviser: H.A.B. Simons, 1981. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Place Names of Africa, 1935-1986: A Political Gazetteer. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



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Rhodes, Smith and the female Chimurenga, Conflict Atlas spread. Modern Candor, exhibition view.



Climate and conflict.

Although the exhibition Modern Candor concerns the Falklands/ Malvinas conflict, visitors to the Allard Pierson Museum will only find two maps of the archipelago. Instead, artist Jasmijn Visser hascreated an installation with a selection of rare books and maps of Panama, Zimbabwe, Nepal and the moon from the Special Collections of the University of Amsterdam. Some of these materials have never been exhibited before.

Using a geographical perspective based around the Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas, Visser shows, for example, how the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914 changed global trade routes, which greatly reduced the importance of the port on the Falkland Islands; or how since 2009, Zimbabweans have been clearing the landmines that the Argentinians planted on the islands during the Falklands War with the United Kingdom in 1982. Visser highlights these relationships in the texts on the floor-plan that leads the visitors through the exhibition, guiding them from scene to scene, always highlighting the relationship between conflict, geology and climate. In this way, Visser connects local events on the islands with major turning points in world history. In this exhibition, conceived as a singular installation, Visser combines maps and books from the Special Collections with infographics that she made in collaboration with Metahaven for the publication Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago.

Allard Pierson Museum Amsterdam 2017.
Partners: Metahaven, Archive Books Berlin, Special Collections of the University of Amsterdam, TAAK, LACDA.
'Modern Candor' is an exhibition on the occasion of the launch of Conflict Atlas—Geopolitics and Contingencies on the Malvinas/Falklands Archipelago by Jasmijn Visser & Metahaven.

The Stopper

Sculpture, Livestream & Website

2018

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The Stopper II. Website, screen capture.



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The Stopper I. Power Play, SongEun Project Space Seoul, documentation.



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The Stopper I. Power Play, SongEun Project Space Seoul, documentation.



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The Stopper I. Power Play, SongEun Project Space Seoul, documentation.



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The Stopper, press image.



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The Stopper I. Power Play, Delfina Foundation London, exhibition view.



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Water-Tap-Clock. The Stopper I, Seoul South Korea.



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The Stopper II. Website, excerpt.



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The Stopper II. Website, excerpt.



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The Stopper I. Exhibtion documentation.



Water-tap-clock.

The Stopper is a project by Jungki Beak and Jasmijn Visser, which explores the power structures of time.

The Stopper I is a livestream on a water-tap-sculpture in Jungki Beak’s apartment in Seoul. The tap leaks drops precisely on the second, creating a tapping sound equal to a clock. The Stopper I is an incantation of boredom and frustration: filling the space with the slow progressing rhythm of seconds, the viewer has no choice to remain passive while being confronted with the passing of time.

The Stopper II is an interactive website in which a rhythm is composed through sound, visuals and intervals in time. On the second, intervalling numbers drop in the manner of the famous Bürk Klappzahlenuhr. The user can push the stop button to stop the current counting interval, but after a second, a new interval appears, igniting a choreography. The user can actively stop time, but can’t control counter-events from occurring, thus never fully gaining control over time.

The Stopper draws its title from a personal tale. Ruth, Vissers' grandmother, earned her livelihood producing mechanisms for industrial clocks in the Bürk factory in the Black Forest, known for station clocks, as well as punch-in time clocks. There she drilled holes in gears for over three decades. An infamous protagonist in the Bürk factory was known as The Stopper. Once a month, he would monitor the workers’ productivity and efficiency, one at a time. On a small stool, he sat by Ruth, and audited her production and assembly pace, stopping the time with the finishing of each tiny element. Careful not to work either faster or slower than usual, she would work on the mechanics in complete synchronicity with The Stopper. With this act a tiny universe was created: The Stopper stopping time in the time production factory.

In an era marked by immediacy, accelerated information circuits, efficiency protocols and digitisation, stopping becomes a violent act which immediately casts the individual outside of society.

Go to website

In collaboration with Jungki Beak.
Commissioned by Kunsthalle Amsterdam & Delfina Foundation London.
Exhibited Moscow Biennial For Young Art 2018.
SongEun Project Space Seoul 2018.
Delfina Foundation London 2019.
VondelCS Amsterdam 2019.

WTPOPE

Publication

2021 (up-coming)

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Khlebnikov quote, Khlebnikov archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Time-space visualisation, Khlebnikov archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Khlebnikov quote, Khlebnikov archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Time-space visualisation, Khlebnikov archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Stalin and train & Kalmyk steppe, sketch page publication. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Traditional Kalmyk hat for Female, Kalmyk archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Khlebnikov quote, Khlebnikov archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



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Kalmyk Horse-riders circa 1900, Kalmyk archive. We, the Presidents of Planet Earth.



I see right through you numbers.

We, the Presidents of Planet Earth explores how collective memory operates within the boundaries of culturally defined perceptions of time and space, taking the plight of the Kalmyk as a case study. After the Soviet attempt to eliminate the complete Kalmyk culture, Kalmykia at present is collectively working to rebuild and re-appropriate their culture. Within this ongoing dialogue, a tension field between power, culture and science unfolds. Futurist poet Velimir Khlebnikov (1885 - 1922) had been raised in Kalmykia, as his father was an administrator of the nomadic Kalmyk’s. This culture, what he dubbed the Kingdom of Horses highly influenced his proposals for mathematics as a universal language. The Buddhist notion of time as an interval played an important role in his proposals for new visualisations of time and space. Literary scientist Elena Vogman discovered these visualisations in St. Petersburg. The archive, comprising over 300 sketches, ao. shows proposals of new schematic timelines, intervals –time constellations– in order to formulate a new understanding of the human construct of time.

We, the Presidents of Planet Earth is a dialogue between Khlebnikov and the Kalmyk, through which they explore their past, present and utopian future. In this dialogue they address intervalling rhythm, in which collective memory is narrated. Vogman, Schäfer and Visser will explore this dialogue through aesthetics, narrative patterns and theory.

Film and Publication in development, expected fall 2019.
In collaboration with Elena Vogman and S†ëfan Schäfer.
Together with Archive Books Berlin, Museum of Moscow, and Kunsthalle Amsterdam.

Little Brother

Video, Website

2019

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Little Brother, screen capture.



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Little Brother, excerpt.



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Little Brother, excerpt.



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Little Brother, excerpt.



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Little Brother, screen capture.



Perpetual countdown

12 years left; 2 degrees; half earth. The future is rendering.

www.fleeting-earth.live

Little Brother was launched at the exhibition ART FWRD, Museumnight 2019. In collaboration with Kunsthalle Amsterdam. The launch coincided with the release of the article occur at Kunstfort bij Vijfhuizen. Designed by Trang Ha

occur

Research, Article

2020 (up-coming)

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occur, press image.



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Otto Neurath and Gerd Arntz, how to dress according to the climate. occur archive.



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Zimbabwe/Rhodesia Climatic Comfort- Discomfort Belts and Building Design 1979, distinguishing between Air Bracing Sunshine Hot, Uncomfortably Hot and Oppresive. occur, archive.



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Detail of Zimbabwe/Rhodesia Climatic Comfort- Discomfort Belts and Building Design 1979, distinguishing between Air Bracing Sunshine Hot, Uncomfortably Hot and Oppresive. occur, archive.



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2 degrees visualisations. occur archive.



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On June 30th 2019, Guadalajara, Mexico was surprised by a hailstorm which covered the region with almost a meter of ice. occur archive.



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Kalmyk hat, the red top symbolising the sun, the traditional zeg pattern symbolising a horse’s hoof. occur archive.



Complex, more complex, invisible.
The crisis of our physical climate is also a crisis of representation. This crisis has roots in the complex nature of climate change: the intrinsically plural phenomenon is stratified over all layers of our society and thus interwoven with a large array of other geopolitical issues. Moreover, overshadowed by these issues, climate change remains often invisible. It leads to the question: how to represent something which does not represent itself?

occur is a complexity model, and a visual identity, for climate change. This contains of narrative patterns and aesthetics which function as a route map through the stratification of climate change. In an age of Post Normal Science, experiments in modelling should embrace the collaboration of the sciences, humanities and the arts. The latter are uniquely equipped to frame a particular characteristic of climate change: the contingent, uncertain, ambiguous, risky and absent.

occur functions as an advice to journalism, diplomacy, education and political bodies.

Go to article

Partners:
CliCom interdisciplinary research group, Anglo-German universities.
Kunstfort Vijfhuizen.
Kunsthalle Amsterdam.
Meertens Institute Amsterdam.

A Crowded Sky

Exhibition, Radio Play

2020

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'A Crowded Sky' exhibition set, Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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'A Crowded Sky' detail exhibition set, Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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'A Crowded Sky' detail exhibition set, Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky' (detail), Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky' (detail), Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Hörspiel, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky' (detail), Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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Typhoon Warning, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Jaebum Kim & Lantian Xie.



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Typhoon Warning, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Jaebum Kim & Lantian Xie.



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Transformation Scenario, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Clemens von Wedemeyer.



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Playstation, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Lawrence Lek.



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Playstation, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Lawrence Lek.



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Setlist, exhibition 'A Crowded Sky', Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.



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The Power of Flow, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Anna Ådahl.



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Tools for Action Archive, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Tools for Action.



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Tools for Action, exhibition view 'A Crowded Sky', Tools for Action.



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Book selection, exhibition 'A Crowded Sky', Jasmijn Visser, S†ëfan Schäfer and Clemens von Wedemeyer.



Crowd psychology in the digital age

A Crowded Sky gathers a group of diverse artists looking at crowd psychology from different strata. In the exhibition space artworks appear and disappear on various locations. Through this time-based format (duration cycle: 80 minutes) the artworks merge into one conversation and simultaneously the artists fuse into one crowd.

Internet 2.0 has enabled crowds to gather in new constellations. At the same time, developments in machine learning have increased crowd surveillance, while algorithmic crowd simulation is deployed to predict future human movements. The exhibition deals with these new and urgent themes in an exhibition in which light, sound and video works alternate in a theatrical way, like actors in a play.

A Crowded Sky is curated and designed by Jasmijn Visser & S†ëfan Schäfer.

Link to booklet A Crowded Sky:
Go to booklet

Artist as Curator.
Exhibition on crowd psychology for Impakt.
The exhibition presents works by Lawrence Lek, Clemens von Wedemeyer, Lantian Xie & Jaebum Kim, Tools for Action, Anna Ådahl, and Jasmijn Visser and S†ëfan Schäfer.
Special thanks to Christoph Scherbaum.
Utrecht, The Netherlands 2020.

Bachelor’s Delight

Installation, Poster, Website

2015

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Space, The Red Bedroom. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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World, The Bird Room. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Microcosm, Drackensteyn Room. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Vitrines and Posters, Upstairs Hallway. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Vitrine, Upstairs Hallway. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Vitrine, Upstairs Hallway. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Poster, Back. Bachelor’s Delight, installation view.



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Microcosm. Bachelor’s Delight, website excerpt.



Bachelor’s Delight is a project by artist Jasmijn Visser in collaboration with designer S†ëfan Schäfer and historian Tristan Mostert, designed for Museum van Loon in 2015.

The exhibition takes shape of a quadriptych, with the website as the first part, together with a poster, digital installation, and objects from the museum’s inventory. These different elements can be viewed separately, but also inform each other. The poster operates as a guide through the website and the installation.

Bachelor’s Delight follows an extensive historical research on the Atlas van Loon by Visser and Mostert. Schäfer and Visser used the museum’s eclectic interior in order to design the project’s visual identity.

Go to website (includes a downloadable verison of the poster).

In collaboration with S†ëfan Schäfer.
Supported by Mondrian Foundation and AFK.
Special thanks to Cato Koole, Philippa van Loon, Tonko Grever, Heerko van der Kooij and Anonymous Production.
Photo Credits: Gert Jan van Rooij.

About

Design & code by Trang Ha
tranghasmail(at)gmail.com
(copyright), 2019